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GROUNDWATER 101


GROUNDWATER: MAKING THE INVISIBLE VISIBLE

With a large population and only 14 inches average annual rainfall, the LA Basin remains a water conundrum. The 10 million people that live in LA County depend on clean, safe and reliable drinking water to use at home at work and in the commercial industries that sprawl throughout the county. However, nature cannot meet the region’s demand through local stormwater alone.

Groundwater has always played an integral role in the water supply for the region and is poised to play a primary role in our drought resiliency. Understanding the region’s groundwater journey reveals how this critical resource will secure the LA Basin’s water security for decades to come.
 

OUR UNSEEN RESOURCE

Early in the LA Basin’s history, groundwater played a central role in providing water to the residents, farms, and industries of the region. Groundwater is the water that exists in the naturally occurring aquifers that are layered beneath our feet. Aquifers refer to sediment layers that are composed of porous gravels or sands and can thus hold and transport water. Aquifer layers are separated by layers of less porous silts or clays referred to as aquitards.

Luckily, the LA area has plenty of naturally occurring aquifers that were produced over millions of years, long before humans came through and settled in the area.